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RE

Key Stage 3 - Study Matrix 2019 – 2020

Rationale

RE is a vital subject to study as we live in such a diverse society with differing faiths and beliefs therefore it is important that our students are encouraged to respect all people. This subject can challenge prejudice, discrimination and racism. Religious Education can and does challenge prejudice, discrimination, racism and stereotypical views.

RE allows students to think about challenging questions and develop lifelong skills such as the ability to evaluate. It allows opportunities for personal reflection, spiritual development and encourages empathy.

This subject plays a key role in the personal development of students and in promoting community cohesion including the virtues of respect and empathy for all people our students might encounter within Darlington which is predominantly white British or other communities they might encounter in future life.

We want our students to leave the academy as tolerant individuals who accept differing beliefs, opinions or behaviours different to their own and encourage inclusiveness.

Intent

At KS3 students are required to acquire a thorough knowledge and understanding of Christianity and are expected to cover three core elements: making sense of the text, understanding the impact and making connections.

The purpose of the curriculum within RE is to also develop key skills such as investigating, reflecting, expressing, interpreting, empathising, applying, discerning, analysing, synthesising and evaluating. Fundamental attitudes which are also core to RE include curiosity, commitment, fairness, respect, self-understanding, open-mindedness, critical mindedness and enquiry.

At key stage 3 it is vital that students know about and understand Christianity as a living faith that influences the lives of people worldwide and that Christianity have shaped British culture and heritage. Students also learn about other major world religions and non-religious world views such as humanism which impact on society, culture and the wider world allowing students to express ideas and insights. The topics studied allows the development of students own spiritual and philosophical convictions, exploring their own beliefs and values.

Broader learning experiences are included within the curriculum (on and off site experiences) such as guest speakers from other faiths and visits to places of worship.

The Prayer Space is to be a place where students can consider their own feelings and emotions and explore prayer in an open, inclusive and safe environment.

Implementation

The curriculum provided in Religious Education consists of two thirds of study time devoted to Christianity and the other third is dedicated to world views. Each unit has an in depth scheme of work to support non-specialist staff and accompanying power points and key information. All of the assessments at key stage 3 are structured as GCSE style questions to develop the necessary skills and knowledge required for GCSE examinations at the end of Year 11.

Via the respect taught within lessons the intent is that this will filter through the whole of academy life including acts of worship.

The Christian faith is also to be embedded each line up with a prayer and also weekly Bible readings linked to the theme of the week.

Year 7 Year 8
Autumn half term 1 Sequential knowledge and skills Christianity: What does it mean for Christians to believe in God as Trinity? Christianity:

What do we do when life gets hard?

Assessment content and methods to judge learning

PAIR marking questions PAIR marking questions
Autumn half term 2 Sequential knowledge and skills Christianity: Should Christians be greener than everyone else? Christianity: Why do Christians believe that Jesus is God on Earth?
Assessment content and methods to judge learning Formal assessment: Assessment point 1 Formal assessment: Assessment point 1
Spring half term 3 Sequential knowledge and skills Christianity: Why are people good and bad? Christianity:

What is so radical about Jesus?

Assessment content and methods to judge learning

PAIR marking questions PAIR marking questions
Spring half term 4 Sequential knowledge and skills Christianity: Does the world need prophets today? Christianity: What kinds of salvation do Christians believe in?
Assessment content and methods to judge learning Formal assessment: Assessment point 2 Formal assessment: Assessment point 2
Summer half term 5 Sequential knowledge and skills World Views: The Buddha; how and why do his experiences and teachings have meaning for people today? World Views:

What is good and what is challenging about being a Muslim teenager in Britain today?

Assessment content and methods to judge learning

PAIR marking questions PAIR marking questions
Summer half term 6 Sequential knowledge and skills World Views: Good, bad; right, wrong: how do I decide? World Views:

How far does it make a difference if you believe in life after death

Assessment content and methods to judge learning Formal assessment: Assessment point 3 Formal assessment: Assessment point 3
Year 7: Unit Titles Students will know that: Christians believe:
What does it mean for Christians to believe in God as Trinity? Christians believe in God as Trinity and that the different roles of the three persons in one God can be seen as exemplifying the relational nature of God and the importance of self-giving love in Christian practice Ideas of God have varied within the Christian Church and different emphases lead to different ways of living

Christians use the Bible to describe God in different ways

It is not simple to talk about God and language about God might use an analogy, symbol or metaphor and still not get close to what God is really like

Not all Christians agonise over theological problems and some might say it is more important to get on with loving God and their neighbour

Should Christians be greener than everyone else? Creation reveals something about the nature of God and reminds humans of their place as dependent upon the creator Humans have a responsibility to creation as stewards Genesis 1 and 2 present different pictures of God

There are various ways of resolving the perceived conflict between science and religion such as interpreting Genesis in different ways

Being made in the image of God can be interpreted widely but implies a significance for human beings and an intimate connection between them and the creator

The story of the fall is interpreted differently by Christians

The idea that sins spoils creation is a fundamental Christian belief but tied to the idea that God brings salvation through Jesus

The idea that human beings are flawed and in need of Gods salvation has influenced Christian thought over centuries

Christians celebrate being created by God and also respond to sin through confession, believing that God forgives by his grace and through Jesus

Why are people good and bad? Genesis 1 and 2 present different pictures of God Being made in the image of God can be interpreted widely but implies a significance for human beings and an intimate connection between them and the creator
Does the world need prophets today? People of God did not always live according to the law; prophets spoke out through words and symbolic actions Prophets called people back to Gods law – they reminded the people of God that their relationship with God was a covenant or an agreement People of God often ignored the voice of the prophet but would repent and come back to God

Sin spoils creation is a fundamental belief but is tied with the idea that God brings salvation through Jesus

Christians focus on the call for social justice as an indicator of how far they are living as the people of God

The Bible has a rich wisdom strand which gives a way of seeing the world and guidance on responding to the challenges of life

The Buddha; how and why do his experiences and teachings have meaning for people today? Describe the life of the Buddha and his teachings (dharma) Explain the Buddhist dharma including the universal truths, noble truths and the noble path. Buddhist traditions are varied but all relate to the dharma

Give reasons and examples to explain how and why Buddhists put their beliefs into action in different ways such as meditation and will show how Buddhist teachings guide them into making moral decisions such as nonviolence and vegetarianism

Offer an account of what difference it makes that overcoming dukkha and attaining enlightenment is achievable by anyone without supernatural help giving reasons

Evaluate how far the ideas of the Buddhist dharma help students to make sense of the world and their own experience

Good, bad; right, wrong: how do I decide? Explain the differences between absolute and relative morality and what difference they make for how people decide what is right and wrong Explain how and why people use and make sense of different sources of authority in deciding how to live.

Show how some religious and non-religious ideas, beliefs and teachings guide people in making moral decisions. Give reasons and examples to explain why people come to different views on moral issues.

Offer a coherent account of the impact of beliefs on how people decide what is right and wrong, comparing two views (e.g. one religious and one non-religious; or contrasting religious views, within or between faith traditions)

Evaluate how far the beliefs and principles studied help students to make sense of the world, offering r reasons and justifications for their responses.

Year 8 Unit Titles Students will know that: Christians believe:
What do we do when life gets hard? The Bible has a rich wisdom strand which gives a way of seeing the world and guidance on responding to the challenges of life Ideas of God have varied within the Church and different emphasises lead to different ways of living

The idea that sin spoils creation is fundamental to Christian belief but is tied with the idea that God brings salvation through Jesus – sin does not have the last word

Why do Christians believe that Jesus is God on Earth? Christians believe that the incarnate Jesus embodies the nature of God and shows them what God is like Christians believe that Jesus’ life offers a pattern for humans and models the way humans should be Christians have used artwork of Jesus to show rich and diverse ways of understanding the incarnation and to reflect on the nature of God

Christians believe the incarnation validates the physical creation and the human body

For Christians Jesus ‘life and teaching exemplify Gods interest in, care for and love of the poor and vulnerable

What is so radical about Jesus? Jesus’ teaching challenged social structures as well as individuals, disappointing some of his contemporaries who wanted the Romans out and the people of God to rule The Bible teaches that the good news is for all people and should bring liberation to individuals lives and transform communities

Jesus’ teaching challenges Christians to embody this transformation in their individual lives, church communities and in the wider world

Christians believe the good news points toward a future rule of God when wisdom will prevail and evil and suffering will end

Jesus’ teachings have influenced Christians and others beyond the Christian tradition

What kinds of salvation do Christians believe in? Salvation is a deep concept that incorporates all the others in the schemes of work and it includes the healing of the whole person of society and the natural world For Christians different ways of understanding how Jesus brings salvation depends upon which aspect of Jesus’ significance they emphasise e.g. his teaching, his example, his death and resurrection The Holy Spirit carries on the work of sanctification in their lives, helping them to be more like Jesus restoring the image of God
What is good and what is challenging about being a Muslim teenager in Britain today? Explain the importance of the key beliefs studied (e.g. iman, ibadah, akhlaq) for Muslim ways of living in Britain today. Give reasons and examples to explain how and why Muslims put their beliefs into action in different ways (e.g. Sunni/Shi’a traditions) and to show how beliefs and teachings guide Muslims in responding to the challenges of life in Britain today.

Give a coherent account of the challenges and opportunities of being a Muslim teenager in Britain today, offering reasons and justifications for their responses.

How far does it make a difference if you believe in life after death Explain the key beliefs about life after death in at least two traditions Explain how and why Christians interpret biblical sources about life after death differently (e.g. Protestant/Roman Catholic) Show how religious and non-religious beliefs about life after death affect the way people live, including how death is marked. Give reasons and examples to explain why people have different views on the idea of life after death.

Offer a coherent account of the impact of beliefs about life after death, comparing two views (e.g. one religious and one non-religious; or contrasting religious views, within or between faith traditions). Evaluate how far different ideas about life after death help students to make sense of the world, offering reason and justifications for their responses

Key Stage 4 - Study Matrix 2019 – 2020

Rationale

RE is a vital subject to study as we live in such a diverse society with differing faiths and beliefs therefore it is important that our students are encouraged to respect all people. This subject can challenge prejudice, discrimination and racism. RE allows students to think about challenging questions and develop lifelong skills such as the ability to evaluate. It allows opportunities for personal reflection and spiritual development and encourages empathy.The GCSE course studied allows students to develop skills which are transferrable to future studies or future job prospects. Skills such as the ability to evaluate are key to this course. Students will develop the ability to argue for and against given statements and to assess the strengths and weaknesses of their arguments in order to reach justified conclusions. The topics that students study are contemporary issues which adults debate hence promoting cultural capital.

Intent

AQA Religious Studies was chosen at Key Stage 4 due to the content and assessments. It is an inspiring and challenging course that develops valuable skills that are sought after by higher education and employers.

The AQA course Specification A was chosen due to the nature of the relevant and contemporary themes to ensure that students have a diverse choice of intriguing subjects to explore and discuss. The course allows study to learn how religion, philosophy and ethics form the basis of our culture and the skills developed prepare students for further study. The specification chosen is enjoyable and engaging for students of all abilities.

As an experienced Team Leader of formal examinations the content, skills and formal assessments are the most appropriate for the students at St. Aidan’s.

The specification covered also covers the content laid down by the Department for Education subject content for Religious Studies.

The intent of the GCSE curriculum is for students to be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the beliefs and practices and sources of authority of two religions including the influence religion has on individuals, communities and societies. Students also study four themes and should be aware of religious perspectives towards each theme. The knowledge and skills developed here contribute massively to cultural capital.

Implementation

The GCSE covers a range of the major world religions, contemporary ethical themes to ensure that the students have a diverse choice of intriguing subjects to explore. Students are challenged with questions about belief, values, meaning, purpose and truth, enabling them to develop their own attitudes towards religious issues. Students will also gain an appreciation of how religion, philosophy and ethics form the basis of our culture. They will develop analytical and critical thinking skills, the ability to work with abstract ideas, leadership and research skills. All these skills will help prepare them for further study.

Year 10 Year 11
Autumn half term 1 Sequential knowledge and skills Christianity: Christian Beliefs Christianity: Christian beliefs and practices revision
Assessment content and methods to judge learning PAIR marking questions Exam questions
Autumn half term 2 Sequential knowledge and skills Christianity: Christian Practices Islam: Islam beliefs and practices revision
Assessment content and methods to judge learning Formal assessment: Assessment point 1 Mock examinations
Spring half term 3 Sequential knowledge and skills Buddhism: Buddhist Beliefs Revision
Assessment content and methods to judge learning PAIR marking questions Exam questions
Spring half term 4 Sequential knowledge and skills Buddhism: Buddhist practices Revision
Assessment content and methods to judge learning Formal assessment: Assessment point 2 Formal assessment: Assessment point 2
Summer half term 5 Sequential knowledge and skills Themes: Themes Revision
Assessment content and methods to judge learning PAIR marking questions Exam questions
Summer half term 6 Sequential knowledge and skills Themes: Themes GCSE examinations
Assessment content and methods to judge learning Formal assessment: Assessment point 3 GCSE examinations
GCSE Unit Titles Content
Christian Beliefs Nature of God including the oneness of God and the Trinity Problem of evil and suffering Different Christian beliefs about creation including the role of the Word and Spirit

Different Christian beliefs about the afterlife

Beliefs and teachings about the incarnation and Jesus as the Son of God

The crucifixion, resurrection and ascension

Sin and the means of salvation

The role of Christ in salvation including law, grace and spirit

The role of Christi in salvation including the idea of atonement

Christian practices Different forms of worship and their significance Prayer and its significance including the Lord’s prayer, set prayers and informal prayer The role and meaning of the sacraments

The sacrament of baptism and its significance for Christians; infant and believers' baptism; different beliefs about infant baptism

The sacrament of Holy Communion/Eucharist and its significance for Christians, including different ways in which it is celebrated and different interpretations of its meaning.

The role and importance of pilgrimage and celebrations including: two contrasting examples of Christian pilgrimage: Lourdes and Iona

The celebrations of Christmas and Easter, including their importance for Christians in Great Britain today.

The role of the Church in the local community, including food banks and street pastors.

The place of mission, evangelism and Church growth.

The importance of the worldwide Church including working for reconciliation

How Christian churches respond to persecution

The work of one of the following: Catholic Agency for Overseas Development (CAFOD), Christian Aid, Tearfund.

Buddhist beliefs The concept of Dhamma (Dharma). The concept of dependent arising (paticcasamupada). The Three Marks of Existence:

Anicca (impermanence) and anatta (no fixed self)

Dukkha (unsatisfactoriness of life, suffering).

The human personality, in the Theravada and Mahayana traditions:

Theravada: the Five Aggregates (skandhas) of form, sensation, perception, mental formations, consciousness

Mahayana: sunyata, the possibility of attaining Buddhahood and Buddha-nature.

Human destiny:different ideals in Theravada and Mahayana traditions: Arhat (a ‘perfected person’) and Bodhisattva ideals

Buddhahood and the Pure Land.

The Buddha’s life and its significance:the birth of the Buddha and his life of luxury, the Four Sights: illness, old age, death, holy man (Jataka 075),the Buddha’s ascetic life, the Buddha’s Enlightenment.

The Four Noble Truths: suffering (dukkha) including different types of suffering , the causes of suffering (samudaya); the Three Poisons, ignorance, greed and hate, the end of craving (tanha), interpretations of nibbana (nirvana) and Enlightenment

The Eightfold Path (magga) to nibbana/nirvana; the pathas the Threefold Way: ethics (sila), meditation (samadhi) and wisdom (panna). Dhammapada 190–191.

Buddhist practices The nature, use and importance of Buddhist places of worship including temples, shrines, monasteries (viharas), halls for meditation or learning (gompas) and their key features including Buddha rupa, artefacts and offerings. Puja, the significance and role of puja/devotional ritual in the home and in the temple, including chanting, both as a devotional practice and as an aid to mental concentration, mantra recitation, use of malas. Meditation, the different aims, significance and methods of meditation:

Samatha (concentration and tranquillity) including mindfulness of breathing

Vipassana (insight) including zazen

The visualisation of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas.

The practice and significance of different ceremonies and rituals associated with death and mourning in Theravada communities and in Japan and Tibet.

Wesak

Parinirvana Day.

Ethical teachings: Karma, rebirth, compassion and lonving kindness

The five moral precepts

The six perfections Mahayana tradition

Theme A Relationships and Families Human sexuality Sexual relationships before and outside marriage

Contraception and family planning

Marriage, divorce and remarriage

Nature of families in the 21st Century and the purpose of families

Gender equality

Theme B Religion and Life The origins of the Universe The value of the world

Use and abuse of the environment including pollution

Use and abuse of animals

The origins of human life

Abortion

Euthanasia

Death and the afterlife

Theme E Crime and Punishment Reasons for crime Attitudes to lawbreakers and different types of crime

Aims of punishment

Attitudes to suffering and causing suffering to others

Attitudes to the treatment of criminals including prison, community service and corporal punishment

Forgiveness

The death penalty

Theme F Human rights and social justice: Social justice and human rights Prejudice and discrimination

Religious freedom

Disability and race

Teachings about wealth

Poverty and its causes

Exploitation of the poor and giving money to the poor

Islam Beliefs Y11 The six articles of faith in Sunni Islam and five roots of Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam, including key similarities and differences. Tawhid (the Oneness of God), Qur’an Surah 112. The nature of God: omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice/Adalat in Shi’a Islam, including different ideas about God’s relationship with the world: immanence and transcendence.

Angels, their nature and role, including Jibril and Mika’il.

Predestination and human freedom and its relationship to the Day of Judgement.

Akhirah (life after death), human responsibility and accountability, resurrection, heaven and hell.

Risalah (Prophethood) including the role and importance of Adam, Ibrahim and Muhammad.

The holy books:Qur’an: revelation and authority, the Torah, the Psalms, the Gospel, the Scrolls of Abraham and their authority.

The imamate in Shi'a Islam: its role and significance.

Islam Practices Five Pillars of Sunni Islam and the Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam (students should study the Five Pillars and jihad in both Sunni and Shi’a Islam and the additional duties of Shi’a Islam). Shahadah: declaration of faith and its place in Muslim practice. Salah and its significance: how and why Muslims pray including times, directions, ablution (wudu), movements (rak’ahs) and recitations; salah in the home and mosque and elsewhere; Friday prayer: Jummah; key differences in the practice of salah in Sunni and Shi’a Islam, and different Muslim views about the importance of prayer.

Sawm: the role and significance of fasting during the month of Ramadan including origins, duties, benefits of fasting, the exceptions and their reasons, and the Night of Power, Qur’an 96:1-5.

Zakah: the role and significance of giving alms including origins, how and why it is given, benefits of receipt, Khums in Shi’a Islam.

Hajj: the role and significance of the pilgrimage to Makkah including origins, how hajj is performed, the actions pilgrims perform at sites including the Ka’aba at Makkah, Mina, Arafat, Muzdalifah and their significance.

Jihad: different understandings of jihad: the meaning and significance of greater and lesser jihad; origins, influence and conditions for the declaration of lesser jihad.

Festivals and commemorations and their importance for Muslims in Great Britain today, including the origins and meanings of Id-ul-Adha, Id-ul-Fitr, Ashura.